Skip to navigation content (Press Enter).

McMaster University

>>  

WELCOME!

Welcome to McMaster and to the Office of the President. The University's website provides a wealth of information about the mission and vision of the University, its innovative educational programs, cutting-edge research, and the students, faculty, staff, alumni, friends, and supporters who make up the McMaster community. I was privileged to become a member of this community in July 2010, when I began my term as President and Vice-Chancellor. More

Back

Principle 1

We are an institution devoted to the cultivation of human potential, which we believe cannot be realized by individuals in isolation from one another, from their history or their imagined future, from the society which surrounds them, or from the physical universe which sustains them. Our programs and activities will reflect this comprehensive view.

Back

Principle 2

It follows that in defining our strengths and seeking to build on them, we will adopt a multidisciplinary perspective, recognizing that even the most specialized problem requires an appropriately broad-based approach.

Back

Principle 3

Our future shall be continuous and consistent with our past, expanding upon and fulfilling the historic character of McMaster as an institution. We will foster the distinct identity of this university, while at the same time continuing to recognize the importance of collaboration and dialogue with sister institutions in Ontario, Canada, and abroad.

Back

Principle 4

Notwithstanding that commitment to continuity with the past and to coordination with practices elsewhere, we will place the highest value on original thought and on innovation.

Back

Principle 5

To that end, we will not only reaffirm the importance of radical questioning at the heart of the academic enterprise, but we will ensure the integrity of our work by bringing a critical view to all of our practices-those which bear directly upon education and research as well as those less directly related to it.

Back

Principle 6

Wherever possible, we will reduce or eliminate obstacles to cooperation.

Back

Principle 7

We will acknowledge, and seek to integrate in all our work and in ways appropriate to our specific fields, an obligation to serve the greater good of our community-locally, nationally, and globally.

Back

Lecture Series

McMaster Seminar on Higher Education: Practice, Policy, and Public Life

The McMaster Seminar on Higher Education: Practice, Policy, and Public Life is a lecture series presented by the Office of the President. The aim of the annual series is to encourage dialogue and inspire critical thought within the McMaster and the broader Hamilton communities. It is intended that the topics will be timely, interdisciplinary, and far-reaching, guided by the key questions and challenges facing higher education institutions and the communities they serve. The series will emphasize the importance to the academy, and to society as a whole, of thinking critically and engaging in meaningful discussion of challenging issues. The series is intended to be of relevance for a wide audience and all members of the community are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Upcoming Events:

Enough
September Session
Presenting:

Bill McKibben
Public Lecture: "ENOUGH"

Date:

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
7:00-8:300pm
FREE ADMISSION

Venue:

Liuna Station
360 James Street North
Hamilton, ON L8L 1H4

Presented by:

Presented by The Bourns Lectureship in Bioethics and the McMaster Seminar on Higher Education: Practice, Policy, and Public Life

 

Details:

Nearly fifteen years ago, in The End of Nature, Bill McKibben demonstrated that humanity had begun to irrevocably alter and endanger our environment on a global scale. Now he turns his eye to an array of technologies that could change our relationship not with the rest of nature but with ourselves. In this speech he explores the frontiers of genetic engineering, robotics, and nanotechnology—all of which we are approaching with astonishing speed—and shows that each threatens to take us past a point of no return. We now stand, in Michael Pollan's words, "on a moral and existential threshold," poised between the human past and a post-human future. McKibben offers a celebration of what it means to be human, and a warning that we risk the loss of all meaning if we step across the threshold. McKibben argues that we cannot forever grow in reach and power—that we must at last learn how to say, "Enough."

Bio:

Bill McKibben is an author and environmentalist. His 1989 book The End of Nature is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has appeared in 24 languages. He is founder of 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement. The Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he was the 2013 winner of the Gandhi Prize and the Thomas Merton Prize, and holds honorary degrees from 18 colleges and universities; Foreign Policy named him to their inaugural list of the world's 100 most important global thinkers, and theBoston Globe said he was "probably America's most important environmentalist." A former staff writer for the New Yorker, he writes frequently a wide variety of publications around the world, including the New York Review of Books, National Geographic, and Rolling Stone. He lives in the mountains above Lake Champlain with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern.